Local Capital Project Delivery

JFK Boulevard Corridor Improvements: Pavonia Ave to St. Paul’s Avenue 

John F. Kennedy Boulevard continues to be the highest-ranked pedestrian corridor in the entire NJTPA region. Both Jersey City and Hudson County have established Complete Streets policies that support safe
and accessible roads for all users, including pedestrians and cyclists. The Local Concept Development Study will analyze safety issues for all users at each intersection from Pavonia Avenue to St. Paul’s Avenue, as well as corridor-wide. This study will explore alternatives to improve pedestrian and bicyclist safety; perform a corridor study for use of travel lanes; and optimize travel time. For more information: https://www.jfkblvdproject.com

Bridge Street Bridge (Essex and Hudson Counties)

The bridge over the Passaic River, which connects Newark and Harrison, is over 100 years old and has structural and functional limitations that don’t meet today’s design standards. The counties are working with the municipalities to determine what bridge improvements are possible. Click here for more information. https://www.bridgestreetbridge.com

Clay Street Bridge (Essex and Hudson Counties)

The County of Hudson and the County of Essex is conducting a study of the existing Clay StreetBridge. The bridge is over 100 years old and has structural and functional limitations that don’t meet today’s design standards. The Counties are working with the municipalities in coordination with NJTPA and NJDOT to determine what bridge improvements are possible. https://www.claystbridge.com

Manhattan Avenue Wall Reconstruction Project

Hudson County, in conjunction with the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority (NJTPA) and the New Jersey Department of Transportation (NJDOT), is conducting this study to explore options for improving and rehabilitating the retaining wall along Manhattan Avenue (CR 683) in Union City from the intersection of Paterson Plank Road, extending 3000 feet north. The stone masonry retaining wall, and a short section of a concrete retaining wall, stretch nearly 2,800 feet, and the wall ranges from 1 foot to approximately 40 feet in height. The stone masonry wall along the west side of Manhattan Avenue was constructed circa 1912 to 1914. Many sections of the wall are in need of repair, reconstruction, or remediation due to major defects and structural deterioration involving vegetation growth, cracks, deteriorated joints, missing stones, seepage, bulging and leaning. The retaining wall needs to be repaired and/or reconstructed to meet acceptable structural and stability requirements in accordance with current standards. Community involvement is a vital part of this study and we encourage the public to participate and provide input on this project. https://www.manhattanavenuewall.com

Click here to view/download: Local Capital Delivery Projects

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